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Papaya 👉 Beautiful pay-what-you-want landing page templates


#1

This is a side project I’ve been working on for the last couple months and I’m finally launching it today. I’d be happy to hear your feedback on the concept and the templates themselves.


#2

Why “name your price”? Any business reasons, or just a fear of placing a price tag?


#3

Good question. Two reasons:

  1. It allows me to avoid having to provide support for the templates, which I have little to no interest in doing.
  2. I’m banking on it drumming up more interest/attention than if these had the usual set price tag, which is one of the main goals of this particular project.

#4

You’re still taking some money for them, and the buyers implicitly believe they are entitled for support. If you do not provide support, that should be made explicit, price or no price.

I guess that was my second-level-why. Why do you believe it would drum up more interest?

I can imagine a conversation in a forum like this “them are great templates and they are cheap!”. Makes sense - people are looking for templates, and found ones and below their budget. Great find!

But I can much less imagine a conversation “them are great and the payment method is curious too”. It rather would go as “… and you can pay $1 for them!”. I.e. from the promotion I do not expect much difference comparing to a fixed low price.

What message “choose your own price” and “donation” models always send me is “I do not know a thing about this internet business and will fail you in other businessy things such as support (oops) or updates”.

It may be just my perception, but I think if you’re looking for a promotion, a lead generation for something else - you better make them explicitly free. If you’re looking for making money from them, apply a fair price tag. Maybe list a comparable prices on other platform for a reference point, or even just some random large non-price number (“these templates served 2,000,000 pages last month!”) that will make your price look small in comparison (that’s directly from Pre-suasion book - apparently it works tho it shouldn’t if we were rational).


#5

Cool man! Nice work getting your side hustle launched, that’s a big accomplishment.

I know it’s v1 of your site, so I won’t give too much feedback regarding design and UX. As far as the pricing model, I think it’s asking a lot of your users at the point of checkout to name a price. Not only do they have to assess all these other features that they would consider when buying any landing page, but yours also comes with the addition of determining the value. I would at least start with a suggested price and then users could adjust from there if they want to.

I’m a subscriber to Envato Elements and, personally, I would have a difficult time being convinced of the value here vs. a service like that which has 100s of LPs for ~$29/month. You may have a difficult time setting yourself apart with just the ‘pay what you want’ model as a differentiator because this particular commodity has become so cheap.

Is there something else about the product that is particularly compelling?


#6

To be clear: This is, and will always be, a side project. I do not expect this to turn into a full-fledged business or make tons of money. It’s just something fun I did on the side to run a little experiment, to create some self promotion, and to make a small amount of side income along the way.

I’ve done one pay what you want HTML template in the past. I didn’t even promote it very much (less than what I’ve already done with Papaya) and it got downloaded thousands of times and made more money than I thought it would. That’s the background on why I chose this particular side project.

I love all the feedback, thanks guys.

@rfctr:

buyers implicitly believe they are entitled for support

I don’t actually agree with this. When I go to Lost Type Co-op and download a pay-what-you-want font, I don’t expect to receive support from the creator. Maybe that’s because I wouldn’t expect support for a free product, and I’m making the choice to pay anything over $0.

Having said that, I may not have been clear—I will release bug fixes and it wouldn’t hurt to include more info about support. I’m just saying I don’t want to help people build entire websites.

Why do you believe it would drum up more interest?

I’m not banking on the payment method being curious—I’m banking on what you described with the “they are cheap” conversation. Pay what you want means you can pay whatever you can afford, including $0. So the downloader decides if it’s cheap or not.

@sbroways:

I would at least start with a suggested price

That’s a good idea, and I’ve actually already put that into the download modals.

I’m a subscriber to Envato Elements … You may have a difficult time setting yourself apart

If this were a business I would be concerned, but I’m comfortable with where this is at from the standpoint of market positioning.


#7

I should have figured weren’t too concerned about monetization or you probably wouldn’t have the name-your-price model, to begin with. :slightly_smiling_face:

One tiny piece of feedback: I wish the images were clickable on the home page. I click them every time to preview the template. You might even have the link open in a new tab.

Good luck!