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Hi, I'm Leon, a new bootstrapper


#1

Hi all,

my name is Leon and I’m a new bootstrapper. By trade I’m a programmer and have been working in the industry for almost 15 years. And now I’m ready to start something of my own - I hope.

So, together with my brother, I founded Suborbital Softworks Ltd. (which even doesn’t have a real website yet). Our plan is to develop and publish OS X software, which I hope isn’t a dead end, as desktop software seems to be perceived as “unsexy” nowadays.

So yeah, just wanted to say hi and keep lurking a little more until our first product is finished. :slight_smile:


#2

“unsexy” is usually good when it comes to commercial software, as it means less competition.

I would hate to try to make a living selling “sexy” software, e.g. games and mobile phone apps.


#3

this is the longest debate ever in the mISV world .
personally i love desktop app’s . but it is very hard market ( very ) as i reading in the web .
Despite everything good luck !


#4

I would hate to try to make a living selling “sexy” software, e.g. games and mobile phone apps.

Funny thing. I worked for a company that made those little skinner box style games. It’s just impossible for your typical mISV to keep up with the competition. The amount of money that went into marketing was incredible. If I had that kind of money at my disposal I’d just retire :wink:

personally i love desktop app’s

Me too. Personally I can’t stand web UIs for anything more complex than filling out some forms. I just hope there are enough people who still prefer desktop software.


#5

but it is very hard market ( very ) as i reading in the web .

I think in the end it really comes down to the value the app offers. If an app solves a specific problem for specific people then these people will use that app, no matter whether it is desktop or web based.


#6

Welcome! I sell both Windows and Mac desktop software, as well as “sexy” (but only skin-deep) iOS apps.

Actually desktop software is “unsexy” only on Windows (hopefully this will change with Windows 10). The Mac market for desktop software is as good as ever, only that you have to be in the Mac App Store to be future-proof. If you want to play the App Store game you have to price your apps cheaply.

Unfortunately for us, the future of desktop applications relies in the App Stores/Markets. The independence mISVs used to have with desktop software will be soon a thing of the past.

Overall is not a question of platforms (Win/Mac/iOS/Android/SaaS) since you can make a fortune or nothing at all on any platform.


#7

How is the Mac appstore comparing to the iOS appstore? Regarding revenue ?


#8

Given the number of apps in each app store: 1.5m in iPhone App Store and only a few dozen in the Mac App Store. The best odds are for the Mac App Store. But your mileage may vary.

You must be prepared for a cold shower when you release your first app in any App Store. The reviews will hit you hard :smile: All the bugs in iOS/OS X will be your problem, and yes there are many!


#9

Do you have to sell via the Mac App store now? Can you not just sell via download from your website? It would give you more control, and avoid people who don’t know how to use a computer.


#10

True story about an unsexy OS X desktop app sold in the OS X App Store:

I’ve had PokerZebra in the App Store since early 2011. It does just one thing: calculate the probability of a poker hand winning against a range of other hands. I’ve updated it possibly once in that time to improve the ability for users to work out how it works. It keeps earning me 50 Euros or so month after month. I do no support for it.

Clearly that’s not much money. But consider that the product is simple, does one thing, and competes with websites that do the same for free…and take whatever lesson you want from it!

http://pokerzebra.com


#11

Yes, you can sell it from your website but future versions of OS X will prevent app developers from distributing apps themselves. Since Mountain Lion (10.8) there is a security setting preventing apps from other sources than the Mac App Store, to load (not active by default). Most developers have both a standalone and a App Store version right now.

App Stores are as easy to use as SaaS apps for the customers so they must be the future for native. The customers don’t have to surrender their CC details to unknown vendors, they receive free updates (courtesy of Apple), and can install on all their Macs. Also App Stores force developers to lower their prices.

Isn’t it wonderful for Apple to have a great third party ecosystem of apps with free or close to free prices, so they can sell even more premium hardware?


#12

No. But it could conceivably happen…


#13

Haha.

The Mac is the one place where desktop software still sells. Many of the great tools I want to buy are Mac only. One of my favourite tools (Scrivener) was Mac only for years.

Because the Mac crowd had a habit of paying for software, developers could target this market. It would be sad to see it die so Apple can sell a few more iNunchuks or whatever.