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Get text message in the morning with KPIs?


#1

I hope I’m not sharing too many idea pitches.

My latest idea is a tool that would send you a text message each morning that says something like this:

Last 24 hours: 12 new email subscribers, $847 in sales.
Visit http://bit.ly/1bdDlXc for more details

I understand a lot of founders compulsively check their stats, especially in the morning. This could be a way to eliminate that annoying 10-minute period in the morning of going around to various dashboards.

What do you guys think?


#2

One of the most wonderful feelings in the morning is when I get a text from my bank that a contract payment has came.

Having said that, I wouldn’t pay for that. Not for my bank’s text, and not for this. This is as “vitamin” as it gets.

Understand me right - I like the idea of having a dashboard over text. I just wouldn’t pay for it.

Maybe there is a place for it in large corporations, where directors/VPs/etc would want to get a short heads-up how the things are going.


#3

Sorry, already done for Mac for sales:

With FastSpring I just get order notifications via email. I also have a Google Analytics email alert when there’s a traffic spike on the site.


#4

@ivm Thank you for mentioning CashNotify!

@jasonswett There are alternatives depending on if you want your notifications on web / desktop / mobile, I’ve made a list here:

You sound like you want an app that combines insights from multiple sources, have you tried Statsbot? They have an option to schedule alerts in Slack.


#5

Why text message? I personally much prefer email (which also comes in on my phone).

There may be a niche that would prefer txt, but I would be surprised.


#6

I read somewhere that text (SMS) is a channel that has a much higher subjective importance, and almost all text messages get read, while only a small subset of emails are. Of course this is mostly important in the context of promotions via text.

Also, it is easier to justify payment for text-based service, because we know that SMS ain’t free. (Not saying that it makes someone more likely to pay; just that the price can be explained.)